About PGC

About Prince George's County
A mere glance at the diversity of Prince George's County confirms our role as a cultural and economic leader of tomorrow. Located in the heart of the Baltimore/Washington corridor, the County borders Washington D.C. and is just 37 miles south of the city of Baltimore. Encompassing almost 500 square miles, Prince George's County has an urban atmosphere that still manages to provide a scenic and peaceful place to live, work, and play. For more details, view the demographics provided by the U.S. Census bureau.

Established in 1696
Prince George's County was formed from land in Calvert and Charles Counties by an act of the General Assembly on Street George's Day, April 23, 1696. The County was named for Prince George of Denmark, husband of Princess Anne, heir to the throne of England. A more detailed history of the County and its government is available from the Prince George's County Memorial Library System.

Elected Officials
The County Executive is Rushern L. Baker, III.
Prince Georges County Municipal Map
The mailing address for the County Executive is:
County Administration Building
Room 2027
14741 Governor Oden Bowie Drive
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772-3050

County Council


The County Council members are:
  • District 1 - Mary A. Lehman
  • District 2 - Deni Taveras
  • District 3 - Dannielle M. Glaros
  • District 4 - Todd M. Turner
  • District 5 - Andrea Harrison
  • District 6 - Derrick Leon Davis
  • District 7 - Karen R. Toles
  • District 8 - Obie Patterson
  • District 9 - Mel Franklin
The mailing address for the County Council is:
County Administration Building
Room 2027
14741 Governor Oden Bowie Drive
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772-3050

Municipal Governments


Within Prince George's County are twenty-seven municipalities.
Incorporated Governments
The oldest of these is Bladensburg, incorporated in 1854. Thereafter, local governments formed at:
  • Laurel (1870)
  • Upper Marlboro (1870)
  • Bowie (1882)
  • Hyattsville (1886)
  • Berwyn Heights (1896)
  • Capital Heights (1910)
  • Mount Rainier (1910)
  • Riverdale Park (1920)
  • Brentwood (1922), Cottage City (1924)
  • Edmonston (1924)
  • North Brentwood (1924)
  • Colmar Manor (1927)
  • Eagle Harbor (1929)
  • Cheverly (1931)
  • Seat Pleasant (1931)
  • Fairmount Heights (1935)
  • District Heights (1936)
  • University Park (1936)
  • Greenbelt (1937)
  • Glenarden (1939)
  • College Park (1945), Forest Heights (1945)
  • Landover Hills (1945)
  • Morningside (1949)
  • New Carrollton (1953)
Source: Maryland Manual online
© Copyright May 15, 2006 Maryland State Archives